America: No, the band

America: No, the band

I cannot remember a time before I knew the band America. I grew up listening to these guys. Dad had the History: America’s Greatest Hits album, and I’d listen to it frequently while staring at the cover art.

Wikipedia tells me the cover art was drawn by Phil Hartman, one of my favorite comic actors. Hartman would become famous on Saturday Night Live, News Radio, and The Simpsons (“Hi, I’m Troy McClure.”) before being murdered by his wife. I didn’t know that until just now. Small world.

Continue reading “America: No, the band”

Carry On Jack (1963)

Carry On Jack (1963)

With Carry On Jack, the series seems to take a cautious step back on track. We are back in color (thankfully), dialed-down considerably on politics, and for the first time in period costume. Of the regulars we have only Kenneth Williams, Charles Hawtrey, and and Jim Dale — and Dale only for a scene or two. Fortunately, the starring cast is rounded out capably by Bernard Cribbins (who will be very familiar to 21st Century Doctor Who fans and 20th Century Doctor Who completists) and Juliet Mills, older sister of Disney star Hayley Mills.

Continue reading “Carry On Jack (1963)”

Why things change

Why things change

Yesterday on Facebook I saw someone say something along the lines of “Democrats try to hurry change, Republicans stand in the way, but things change at their own pace.”

No; things change because people change them. Just to pick an example: men would never have gotten together on their own and said “hey, let’s give women the right to vote.” Behind every major social change there are brave, hard-working people willing to push.

Continue reading “Why things change”

Carry On Cabbie (1963)

Carry On Cabbie (1963)

An occupational hazard with watching these old movies is that sometimes the world has moved on so far that the very premise seems wrong. Of course, it was a very different world in 1963, what with the George Wallacing, the whites-only hotels, iconic MLK speeches, and a Presidential assassination. The Beatles released their first album and Sylvia Plath committed suicide. (The two events are presumably unrelated.)

Continue reading “Carry On Cabbie (1963)”

This campaign reminds me of a very young me

This campaign reminds me of a very young me

I didn’t watch the debate on Monday. Instead I watched the final Mystery Science Theater 3000 episode from their Comedy Central run: Laserblast. It’s a Charles Band film and cheerfully entertaining in its own right, and then MST3K ended the series (they thought) with an elaborately staged spoof of Kubrick’s 2001. Actually, the episode is online. Just take ninety minutes and watch the whole thing.

Might as well; the rest of this post is about politics.

Continue reading “This campaign reminds me of a very young me”